Where do U.S. greenhouse gas emissions come from?


The American Electric Power coal burning plant in Conesville, Ohio. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says that about one tenth of America’s greenhouse gas emissions come from the agriculture industry.

“Everyone assumes what’s happening globally is happening nationally,” Vilsack said Tuesday, according to The Des Moines Register’s report. “Clearly, there are challenges globally in terms of agriculture and its contribution to greenhouse gas emissions. That’s not necessarily the case in the United States.”

So what constitutes the other 90 percent? According to the EPA, the biggest contributor is generating electricity — with coal burning one of the larger C02 producers — to use in businesses, homes, and factories.

This is where U.S. greenhouse gas emissions came from by economic sector in 2012:

Broken down, here’s where greenhouse gases originate by sector, since 1990 (2007 is the most recent data available from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change):

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