Little will for American involvement in Ukraine


A young demonstrator with his mouth covered by a Russian flag attends a rally of pro-Russia supporters outside the regional government administration building in the center of the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk. Photo by Alexander Khudoteply/AFP


There is little American political will for strong U.S. intervention in Ukraine, a new poll finds.

While a majority, 55 percent, say the situation in Ukraine is key to U.S. national interests, 50 percent of Americans don’t think the U.S. should “draw a hard line against Russia in Ukraine because it could mean losing Russia’s cooperation on other issues like Iran and Syria,” according to a McClatchy-Marist poll out Tuesday.

Roughly half favor a diplomatic and economic approach, but almost as many 43 percent think the U.S. should not get involved at all. Just seven percent support considering military options.

That is despite two-thirds, 66 percent, thinking Russia won’t stop at Crimea and almost half, 46 percent, saying another cold war is likely. A majority of Republicans, 54 percent, feel this way, while just 45 percent of independents and 41 percent of Democrats say so.

By a 45-45 percent margin, Americans are split on President Obama’s handling of the crisis in Ukraine. Predictably, 72 percent of Republicans disapprove, while 69 percent of Democrat approve.

Regarding Obama’s overall job approval, 45 percent approve, while 52 percent disapprove.

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