Humanities Desk On Demand

June 5, 2015
On the June 5th edition, "Friday Live" previews: a symposium and the Juneteenth Celebration at the Malone Center in Lincoln; a Hastings College Summerstage old fashioned melodrama; Homestead Days near Beatrice; the latest production by the TADA Theatre; Theatre West's latest show in Scottsbluff;... more››
May 23, 2015
The first roller skate was patented in 1760 by a Belgian inventor, but you don't have to travel across the Atlantic to see it. You can find a model of it at the National Museum of Roller Skating in Lincoln. As part of our occasional series, When Things Speak, museum director James Vannurden told... more››
May 9, 2015
Before 1879, Native Americans weren't recognized as people under United States Federal law. That all changed because of a trial in Omaha, and because of a member of the Ponca tribe named Standing Bear. Today there are Nebraskans working to commemorate Standing Bear on a national scale.
May 2, 2015
In the 1870s, thousands of Germans from Russia left Russia for the United States. By 1910, the US census counted 13,000 Germans from Russia in Nebraska alone. Diane Wilson says these new immigrants started transitioning to American life by continuing a lot of their own traditions, especially when... more››
April 24, 2015
Forty years after the fall of Saigon, an Omaha man is still fighting for the Vietnam he wants to see.
April 24, 2015
Ervin Krause wrote dark stories about people in turmoil. Drawing on a life filled with hardship on the post-depression plains, Krause's stories were lessons of morality for unprincipled characters, so unprincipled that one of his stories triggered a censorship, the resignation of an editor, and a... more››
April 17, 2015
Of all the hardships homesteaders faced on the prairie -- grasshoppers, drought, blizzards and fires -- one of the most humiliating was bedbugs. The story of homesteader Faye Cashatt Lewis begins with loneliness and maddening frustration, but it ends with her emancipation from the past.
April 10, 2015
Earl Guy wrote his first novel in a Minnesota prison. With his chair leaned against the wall of his cell and a pen and a notebook in hand, Guy told the story of a family struggling to keep afloat as the Mississippi River encroaches on their land.
April 4, 2015
Art can be a way to time travel. To look back into the past and see how an artist saw the world. Art can also be a way for contemporary artists to address history. As part of our occasional series, When Things Speak, Johanna Sawyer, curatorial assistant at The Great Plains Art Museum in Lincoln,... more››
March 27, 2015
What is there to envy about being black in American in the 1930s? The question is at the heart of "The Envied Ones," an essay by Bertram Lewis. Lewis was an author who fought for African-American literature to be valued for what it was, not what its white audience thought it should be.

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