Humanities Desk On Demand

August 20, 2008
Forty years ago, a couple of boxes of photo negatives sold for $15 at a garage sale. The pictures turned out to be an historical goldmine. Deciding that John Johnson was the photographer is a change from previous scholarship. At one time, the photographer was though to be Earl McWilliams, and thus... more››
August 11, 2008
The Beijing Olympics are off and running—and jumping. Jerry Johnston reports that a Nebraskan who saw one of the olympic sites being built will have to watch events from her Omaha home.
August 5, 2008
Strategic Discussions for Nebraska website: http://www.unl.edu/sdn
July 28, 2008
A new dictionary of the Lakota language just hit the bookshelves. The dictionary's editors hope the twenty thousand words and definitions will help keep the native Sioux language alive. South Dakota Public Radio's Charles Michael Ray reports.
July 15, 2008
The best known radio personality of the 1930's was in Hastings recently, as the Chautauqua brought Will Rogers to town. To read more about the history of Chautauqua in Nebraska and about this year's Chautauqua, please visit http://www.nebraskahumanities.org/programs/chautauqua.html.
July 8, 2008
To read more about the history of Chautauqua in Nebraska and about this year's Chautauqua, please visit http://www.nebraskahumanities.org/programs/chautauqua.html.
June 27, 2008
For more on Maximilian's Journals and Karl Bodmer, and the current exhibit at the Joslyn Art Museum, please visit http://www.joslyn.org/exhibitions.
June 20, 2008
People in Falls City and in Hastings will get a chance over the next two weeks to see history unfold—Chautauqua is coming to town. For a complete rundown of the schedules in Falls City and Hastings, visit http://www.nebraskahumanities.org/programs/chautauqua.html.
June 3, 2008
John Sibbit is a Nebraska rancher featured in the NET Television documentary "Beef State." He tells the story of how the news of JFK's assassination put his ranch in economic peril.
June 3, 2008
A new monument marks the previously nameless graves of African American homesteaders.

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