Science

featured

Innovation and Creativity in Nebraska
Good ideas often start with a simple question. "What if?" Nebraskans answer with innovation and creativity. We tell their stories in our new NET Television series, "What If..."
December, 2018
As a result of light pollution, nearly 80% of Americans cannot see the Milky Way from their homes at night. In this 360-video, join a group of people who travel to the Sand Hills to reconnect with nature's nocturnal majesty.
After Ebola
Nebraska And The Next Pandemic
The personal stories of medical professionals in the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit and lessons learned from the Ebola crisis.
A group of scientists are experimenting with drones to see if this developing technology can be used to combat wildfires and save lives. Follow along on their first “real-world” scenario as they perform a prescribed burn at... more››
A group of UNL students compete for bragging rights in diagnosing dirt… or the science of soil. In just under an hour, the students must analyze the content and quality of soil in a particular area. Our cameras capture these... more››
Scientists at Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium discuss their conservation efforts.

Science | Nebraska

For many in Nebraska, wind is merely an occasional nuisance. But for farmers, it can have an impact on their livelihood. University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers are using a new wind tunnel facility to find ways to improve chemical application in agriculture.
Each spring, an Olympic event takes place in Nebraska that draws hundreds of middle school and high school students. But this Olympics in't about physical feats of strength, speed or endurance - it's an Olympiad for the mind. Watch Nebraska Science Olympiad hopefuls as they hone their skills.
Can nature be re-created? That's the challenge in Jungle Under Glass, as Dr. Lee Simmons and his staff at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha work to create the Lied Jungle, the world's largest indoor rain forest.
With growing pressure on the world's gas supply, University of Nebraska biologist George Oyler is working with researchers in California and New Mexico on a fuel alternative - algae for fuel.
Join photographer Mike Forsberg and UNL hydrologist Jim Goeke seeks connections between Nebraska Sandhills wildlife and the hidden underground water supply known as the Ogallala Aquifer.

Pages