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What If...Innovator Insights
Innovator Insights
What drives Nebraska’s innovators, big thinkers, risk takers? We explore this in the “What If…” project component, designed for a high school/college age target audience, called “Innovator Insights.”
December, 2018
As a result of light pollution, nearly 80% of Americans cannot see the Milky Way from their homes at night. In this 360-video, join a group of people who travel to the Sand Hills to reconnect with nature's nocturnal majesty.
After Ebola
Nebraska And The Next Pandemic
The personal stories of medical professionals in the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit and lessons learned from the Ebola crisis.
A group of scientists are experimenting with drones to see if this developing technology can be used to combat wildfires and save lives. Follow along on their first “real-world” scenario as they perform a prescribed burn at... more››
It's totally part of the game to get down and dirty in the annual soil judging contest. Watch agronomy students from regional colleges jump at the chance to identify, evaluate, classify and describe soil profiles. http://... more››
Scientists at Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium discuss their conservation efforts.

Science | Nebraska

After a long battle with corn rootworm, Midwest farmers thought they’d found relief in genetically modified seeds engineered to produce toxins deadly to the pest.
Vacant lots are a big problem for cities that have lost a lot of their population, like Detroit and Cleveland. That’s got people tinkering with ways to do something meaningful with the space, such as plant an urban farm or create a neighborhood park.
Cannabis has been in the news recently, with states like Colorado and Washington legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. But the cannabis plant is surprisingly versatile, and drugs aren’t the only thing produced from it.
Much of the water that flows through Nebraska originates high up in the Rocky Mountains. Each winter, as snow accumulates there, hydrologists calculate how much water that melts from it will end up downstream.
Every spring, millions of birds migrate through the Platte River in central Nebraska on their way north. They’ve been doing it for thousands of years.

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