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Discover how a University of Nebraska-Lincoln textile scientist is transforming corn husks into fibers for clothing. Could husk fibers rival cotton as a mainstay for textiles in the future?
QUEST:  America's Energy Future
From fossil fuels to renewables, the race is on to find better ways to manage and maximize our energy sources.
QUEST:  Restoring America's Waters
Explore efforts to rebuild oyster reefs, battle algae blooms, and restore salmon to a dammed river in this television episode.
QUEST: Next Meal - Engineering Food
Are the benefits of genetically engineered foods worth the risks? This half-hour QUEST Northern California special explores the pros and cons of genetically engineered crops, and what the future holds for research and regulations.
Discover innovative approaches for producing and maximizing our food resources. Explore how a Milwaukee farmer feeds a growing urban population, discover strategies for reducing food waste in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond... more››

Science | Nebraska

After the discoveries at Ashfall, there was a great need to protect the fossils and allow the public to see them. This segment shows the process of building the Ashfall Fossil Beds State Historic Park and is from the 1992 NET program Mysteries in the Dust.
Mike Voorhies talks about how he first discovered a baby rhino skull that led to the Ashfall fossil beds. This segment is from the 1992 NET program, Mysteries in the Dust.
The mystery in the dust began 10 million years ago at a water hole on the savanna that would become Nebraska. This segment is from the 1992 NET program Mysteries in the Dust.
Nebraska writer and scientist Loren Eiseley captured the fascination he felt in discovering the past in fossils and bones. This segment is from the 1994 NET program, Reflections of a Bonehunter.
After a long battle with corn rootworm, Midwest farmers thought they’d found relief in genetically modified seeds engineered to produce toxins deadly to the pest.

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