Watching the Water: Floods of 2011, continued

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July 25, 2011 - 7:00pm








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Photo by Robyn Wish, KVNO News

Workers prepare the Tailgate Tent outside TD Ameritrade Park on Wednesday, June 15.


Omaha battles sewers as CWS kicks off

Robyn Wisch, KVNO News
June 17, 2011

OMAHA, NEB. -- Thousands of people are heading to Omaha today as the College World Series kicks off in a brand new downtown stadium. But rising waters from the nearby Missouri River, along with seeping sewage, is creeping up to the baseball stands.





Photo courtesy of Unified Command,
District of Columbia Geographic Information System


Omaha Evacution Zone

District of Columbia Geographic Information System
June 16, 2011

OMAHA, NEB. -- The evacuation zone if water from the Missouri River breaches the levee in northeast Omaha.





Photo courtesy of the
Missouri River Joint Information Center

View of the plastic covering on Ditch 6 levee at Hamburg, Iowa, June 16. Following a full breach of levee L-575 June 13, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers immediately underwent further construction to raise the elevation of Ditch 6 levee. The plastic covering protects the levee from wave action that could cause erosion.


Ditch 6 levee at Hamburg

Missouri River Joint Information Center
June 17, 2011

HAMBURG, IOWA -- Updated photos of levees guarding Hamburg, from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Omaha District.





Photo by Mike Tobias, NET News


Flooding could impact grain movement, marketing

NET News
June 16, 2011

BLAIR, NEB. -- Nebraska farmers will feel the force of floods. The Farm Service Agency estimates that 90,000 agricultural acres along the Missouri River alone could be impacted by flooding. But that impact goes beyond flooded fields, potentially affecting what happens to grain after it leaves the farm.





Photo by Jonathan Ash, NET News


Vital records worth saving when disaster strikes

NET News
June 17, 2011

LINCOLN, NEB. -- Fires, tornadoes and flooding have recently created chaos in the Midwest. While each type of disaster brings its own unique form of destruction, each can lay waste to vital records. With rising waters threatening the Platte and Missouri Rivers, Jonathan Ash reports how vital records play an important role in maintaining the continuity of business and family.






Updated Hamburg, Iowa flood map

U.S. Army Corps - Omaha District
June 16, 2011






NEMA hoping Nebraska levees continue to hold

NET News
June 15, 2011

LINCOLN, NEB. -- As residents of Hamburg, Iowa wait for the Missouri River to reach a secondary levee protecting the town, other communities on the river are wondering whether they could also be one step from disaster. Al Berndt, assistant director of Nebraska Emergency Management Agency, joined Grant Gerlock of NET News on Morning Edition for an update on the flood threat in Nebraska.





Photo by Bill Kelly, NET News


Nemaha County waits for the water to come

NET News
June 15, 2011

NEMAHA COUNTY, NEB. -- As some of the highest flood waters in the state's history move down the Missouri River Valley, Bill Kelly of NET News traveled the backroads of Southeast Nebraska, where they're waiting for the flood's crest to arrive. From Indian Cave State Park to the levees guarding Peru, he found people deeply concerned, or taking it in stride, in equal measure.





Hamburg, Iowa, Places Hopes On Temporary Levee

NPR
June 14, 2011

HAMBURG, IOWA -- Residents of Hamburg, Iowa, hope that a temporary levee will save their town from the rising Missouri River. Workers are adding to the levee to raise its height. It is the town's last line of defense after another levee was breached.





Photo by Robyn Wisch, KVNO News


Hamburg residents anxiously wait to see if Missouri River will reach town

KVNO News
June 14, 2011

HAMBURG, IOWA -- It's quiet and somber in Hamburg today, as the city watches and waits to see if the rising Missouri waters reach their town. Robyn Wisch with KVNO News has the story.





Photos of Plattsmouth and Nebraska City

NET News
June 12, 2011
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB. - NET reporter Fred Knapp and his son Christopher took photos of the encroaching floodwaters Sunday in Plattsmouth and Nebraska City. Click here for a larger version of the slideshow.





Photo by Robyn Wisch, KVNO News

The Missouri River had, by June 9, almost entirely swallowed up a road that runs along the edge of Sandy Smith's property.


Farmers race against time, as Missouri approaches

KVNO News
June 13, 2011

OMAHA, NEB. -- The Missouri River flooding is impacting people all along the river's bank - many are farmers who've lived on the land for generations.





Flooded out: What would you do?

KVNO News
June 9, 2011

OMAHA, NEB. -- What would you do if you had to move out of your home because of the rising Missouri River? How would you react, and how would the move affect your daily life?





Flood recovery a daunting task for Missouri farmers

Harvest Public Media
June 6, 2011

MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, MO. -- With 130,000 acres of homes, fields and equipment still underwater in southeast Missouri, farmers there are trying to salvage their future in farming. The Mississippi River came rushing in several weeks ago when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blasted open three levees to save a town downstream but the Corps doesn't plan to fix the levees until next year at the earliest. And with the land also being eyed for wetland reclamation, the farmers' challenges are growing day by day.





Photo by Fred Knapp, NET News

Water from Lake McConaughy cascades down the Morning Glory structure at Kingsley Dam near Ogallala.


Surge in mountain floodwaters threatens Nebraska homes



NET News
June 3, 2011

OGALLALA, NEB. -- As a record snowpack begins to melt in Colorado and Wyoming, Nebraska is on the receiving end of floodwaters that are filling up the Platte River. Kingsley Dam spans the Platte, and for the first time since the dam's completion in 1941, officials are using the dam's Morning Glory structure to send water downstream.




Flooding a rising concern on Missouri River


NET News
June 3, 2011

OMAHA, NEB. -- The Missouri River is above flood stage along almost the entire eastern Nebraska border and more water is on the way. The Army Corps of Engineers has established a Joint Information Center to provide daily updates on the situation. Colonel Robert Ruch is Commander of the Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District. He tells NET News' Grant Gerlock that the current flood in Nebraska started with record rainfall hundreds of miles away.





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