With 11 percent uninsured, Nebraska ranks better than most states in new U.S. Census data

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December 17, 2013 - 4:20pm

No Health Insurance Coverage by State

1 - Massachusetts, 4.0%

2 - Hawaii, 7.0%

3 - Vermont, 7.6%

16 - Nebraska, 11.4%

48 - Florida, 20.5%

49 - Nevada, 21.6%

50 - Texas, 23.0%


No Health Insurance by Neb. County

1 - Howard, 5.6%

2 - Seward, 6.3%

3 - Cass, 7.2%

4 - Washington, 7.3%

5 - Red Willow, 7.3%

Nebraska Overall, 11.4%

89 -Sheridan, 19.4%

90 - Colfax, 19.5%

91 - Hayes, 19.9%

92 - Blaine, 21.6%

93 - Thurston, 31.8%


No Health Insurance by Neb. Community (more than 2500)

1 - Gretna, 1.5%

2 - Waverly, 3.0%

3 - Papillion, 5.0%

4 - Seward, 6.2%

5 - Plattsmouth, 6.8%

Nebraska Overall, 11.4%

46 - Grand Island, 17.2%

47 - Scottsbluff, 18.8%

48 - South Sioux City, 19.1%

49 - Lexington, 19.5%

50 - Schuyler, 27.1%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.

More than 200,000 Nebraskans do not have health insurance, and with 11.4 percent of the population uninsured the state ranks in the top half nationally (16th) for fewest uninsured residents. This is according to new U.S. Census Bureau 2008-2012 American Community Survey information released Tuesday.

Texas (23.0 percent) has the highest rate of uninsured residents, while Massachusetts (4.0 percent) has the lowest. The national average is 14.9 percent.

Among Nebraska counties, Howard (5.6 percent) and Seward (6.3 percent) have the lowest rates of uninsured residents, while Thurston (31.8 percent) and Blaine (21.6 percent) have the highest.

Among Nebraska communities with at least 2,500 residents, Gretna (1.5 percent) and Waverly (3.0 percent) have the lowest rates of uninsured residents, while Schuyler (27.1 percent) and Lexington (19.5 percent) have the highest.

While the uninsured rate for all Nebraskans is 11.4 percent, the uninsured rate for Nebraska Hispanic/Latino residents is 30.4 percent.

More detail on the American Community Survey information, including additional data on disabilities, household income, education and more can be found here.

Note: The University of Nebraska at Omaha Center for Public Affairs Research provided assistance with this story.

 

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